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124 Pleasant Street
Marblehead, MA, 01945
United States

+1.781.797.0211

Each water harvest requires we row out to find the best salt blooms off the coast of Marblehead.

Our salt is made according to a 1,600-year-old process perfected by monks of Mount Athos, yet prepared using local sea water from the Marblehead coast North of Boston.

We are one of the few salterns on the East Coast of the United States and the only one that uses ancient, monastic saltern methods.

Unlike mass produced salts, ours benefit from a seasonality and vintage that can only occur with small batch salts. Autumn, winter, spring and summer salts are unique in that they have distinct algal, current and saline bloom signatures.

We can also vary the minerality and the salinity within a certain tolerance for our more demanding customers providing a bespoke saline experience.

You may also notice the live taste quality and delicate crystalline structure of our fresh salt that melts right on contact. Because of the freshness of our salt, you can also use less of it which makes it perfect for those looking to cut down on their salt consumption.

 

St. Patrick's Day Feast

Feasts

We like to celebrate and learn from the success of others.  And every day the Church gives us that opportunity.  So while we can't party every day, we can celebrate a few Feasts especially meaningful to our community.  We invite you to share in our joy.  Welcome!

St. Patrick's Day Feast

St. Patrick of Ireland
St. Patrick of Ireland

St. Patrick's Day Feast

40.00

Here's what you need to know if you'd like to come:

Where: 124 Pleasant Street in Marblehead at the Shrine of St. Nicholas the Wonderworker, Patron of Sailors, Brewers and Repentant Thieves.

When: Saturday, March 17 (times below)

Why: To celebrate St. Patrick, Enlightener of Ireland!

The details:

5 PM - We will say a little prayer service to St. Patrick and light some candles to the Saint.

6 PM - The Feast is served!  Capellini with clam sauce appetizer, lobster poached in olive oil as an entree, salad (onions, tomatoes, Marblehead Salt and olive oil) and lemon sorbet for desert.

Beer and soda are a la carte.

All food is appropriate for the Lenten Fast.

Quantity:
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St. Patrick's Story


Saint Patrick, the Enlightener of Ireland was born around 385, the son of Calpurnius, a Roman tax collector. He lived in the village of Bannavem Taberniae, which may have been located at the mouth of the Severn River in Wales. The district was raided by pirates when Patrick was sixteen, and he was one of those taken captive. He was brought to Ireland and sold as a slave, and was put to work as a herder of swine on a mountain identified with Slemish in Co. Antrim. During his period of slavery, Patrick acquired a proficiency in the Irish language which was very useful to him in his later mission.

He prayed during his solitude on the mountain, and lived this way for six years. He had two visions. The first told him he would return to his home. The second told him his ship was ready. Setting off on foot, Patrick walked two hundred miles to the coast. There he succeeded in boarding a ship, and returned to his parents in Britain.

Some time later, he went to Gaul and studied for the priesthood at Auxerre under Saint Germanus (July 31). Eventually, he was consecrated as a bishop, and was entrusted with the mission to Ireland, succeeding Saint Palladius (July 7). Saint Palladius did not achieve much success in Ireland. After about a year he went to Scotland, where he died in 432. 

Patrick had a dream in which an angel came to him bearing many letters. Selecting one inscribed “The Voice of the Irish,” he heard the Irish entreating him to come back to them.

Although Saint Patrick achieved remarkable results in spreading the Gospel, he was not the first or only missionary in Ireland. He arrived around 432 (though this date is disputed), about a year after Saint Palladius began his mission to Ireland. There were also other missionaries who were active on the southeast coast, but it was Saint Patrick who had the greatest influence and success in preaching the Gospel of Christ. Therefore, he is known as “The Enlightener of Ireland.”

His autobiographical Confession tells of the many trials and disappointments he endured. Patrick had once confided to a friend that he was troubled by a certain sin he had committed before he was fifteen years old. The friend assured him of God’s mercy, and even supported Patrick’s nomination as bishop. Later, he turned against him and revealed what Patrick had told him in an attempt to prevent his consecration. Many years later, Patrick still grieved for his dear friend who had publicly shamed him.

Saint Patrick founded many churches and monasteries across Ireland, but the conversion of the Irish people was no easy task. There was much hostility, and he was assaulted several times. He faced danger, and insults, and he was reproached for being a foreigner and a former slave. There was also a very real possibility that the pagans would try to kill him. Despite many obstacles, he remained faithful to his calling, and he baptized many people into Christ.

The saint’s Epistle to Coroticus is also an authentic work. In it he denounces the attack of Coroticus’ men on one of his congregations. The Breastplate (Lorica) is also attributed to Saint Patrick. In his writings, we can see Saint Patrick’s awareness that he had been called by God, as well as his determination and modesty in undertaking his missionary work. He refers to himself as “a sinner,” “the most ignorant and of least account,” and as someone who was “despised by many.” He ascribes his success to God, rather than to his own talents: “I owe it to God’s grace that through me so many people should be born again to Him.”

By the time he established his episcopal See in Armargh in 444, Saint Patrick had other bishops to assist him, many native priests and deacons, and he encouraged the growth of monasticism.

Saint Patrick is often depicted holding a shamrock, or with snakes fleeing from him. He used the shamrock to illustrate the doctrine of the Holy Trinity. Its three leaves growing out of a single stem helped him to explain the concept of one God in three Persons.

Saint Patrick died on March 17, 461 (some say 492).  Saint Columba of Iona (June 9) says the Holy Spirit revealed to him that Patrick was buried at Saul, the site of his first church. A granite slab was placed at his traditional grave site in Downpatrick in 1899.